Newsletter

You Are What You Are

10.06.16 — 23.07.16

Curated by Nils Petersen & Anna Redeker

 

 

You Are What You Are is a group exhibition that presents nine emerging artists who deal with nature as the material of our existence. The artistic approaches are diverse and examine the correlations of nature and human beings in various complex ways. The aspect of irreversible alterations caused by humans on our environment matters equally as the visualization of history, origin and subjective experiences, displayed trough natural materials. Natural processes such as growth, overlay and layering are being visualized in the exhibition as well as traces of light;

Questions on our civilizational and historical past are being asked as well as how our future could be looking like and how our posterity will understand our momentary present. Will it be possible to reconstruct our current state on the basis of leftover objects, similar to our usual practice to examine the earliest history of mankind trough objects and geology? What is it that makes us the way we are and the way we act, and what separates us from nature? At the end, there will be the question of what is going to remain of us – and what will remain of nature.

 

 

Julius von Bismarck

 

Central to the work of Julius von Bismarck is the examination of the human perception of nature and environment. By interventions in relations tot he significant impact that human actions have on our environment and how this affects our general perception of nature. The video „Forest Apparatus“ shows the artist, supported by several assistants, carrying huge parts of a sculpture into the woods. There, the single parts are getting build together and finally the whole object gets installed. The sculpture is made out of aluminum, construction foam and color turns out to be a lifelike reproduction of a birch. After the birch has been placed in the middle of a birch grove, the illusion becomes perfect: the sculpture can be hardly distinguished from the real birches around it. The knowledge of the artificial birch changes the perception of the entire forest in a substantially way: If you start to find the unreal tree, suddenly all the trees appear dubious and are getting examined on their authenticity.

 

Jan Bünnig

 

The sculptor Jan Bünnig deals in an incisive and ironic manner with both the creative process of an artists as well as the traditional connotations and actual characteristics of the materials he uses for his artworks. Often, his sculptures are site-specific works whose material condition changes during the duration of the exhibiton and thereby evoke associations of growth, mortality and uncontrollability. Most times, the artist uses original materials such as wood, clay, stone and sand and creates forms that stand contrary to their actual material features. With the works the artists present in the exhibition, he stages a past that turns out to be just a claim of himself: the so-called prehistoric objects entitled “Toilet Brush”, “Early Broom” and „Szepter“ appear like archeological finds of Stone Age commodities, but their potential function turns out to be useless and thereby ironically refer to the achievements of the modern age.

 

Julian Charrière

 

With his work, the artist Julian Charrière creates some kind of an “archeology of the present” by imitating, repeating and exaggerating the impact that humans have on our environment. His interventions are visualized by photography, sculpture and video. He stages the piece “Metamorphism” on the basis of scientific exhibtions of naturehistorical museums, but the exhibited object appears to be not a geological relic but seems to come from the future: On a pedestal we see an object inside a glass vitrine which reminds us of a geological find. If we look closer, we discover that the object consists of melted technical material and congealed magma which was put together to a stone. We see fragments of technical devices such as smartphones and hard drives as well as laptops and tablet computers. With this work, Charrière refers to the potential of nature to make history visible through its geological layers. This form of primeval storaging gets faced to our modern form of storaging and saving. By combining the disks and hard drives with the visuals of geological rock formations, he “constructs a synthetic image of a future past, a place where the traces of our civilization will hide among rock formations.“

 

Paula Doepfner

 

In her work, Paula Doepfner uses contrasting materials such as bulletproof glass and pressed flowers, melting ice and handwritten texts on paper. Based on the medium of drawing, the artist deals with questions about the universality and transience of subjective emotions and their impact on our consciousness and environment. She integrates neuroscientifical, philosophical and lyrical texts into her work by handwriting them in smallest size onto sheets of paper. Together with the pressed flowers, fragile forms emerge behind glass – and evoke associations of nerves and streams of thoughts by themselves. The ephemeral piece “Stasera” consists of an ice block in which flowers and sheets with handwritten text are frozen in. During the exhibition, the ice melts and releases the frozen material. Likewise the inability to transfer or repeat subject experiences, the sculpture also cannot be reconstructed. The work “Shut softly your watery eyes” shows an organic form out of flowers, earth and pigments behind bulletproof glass and refers also to the fragility and ephemerality of thoughts and moments.

 

Mariana Hahn

 

Mariana Hahn examines the question of an universal destiny, which – apart from individual experiences – is inscribed in our bodies and in our environment. Using different media such as performance, drawing, video and photography, she arouses questions about our past, about the stories and memories that made us what we are. With the pieces shown in the exhibition she refers to the body and the sea as an archive. The dress made out of silk reminds in its texture of animal skin and fish bellies and thus refers to nature as the material of our existence. At the same time, it is a symbol for the human, shaped by evolution and incorporating history and development. Together with the dried fish heart that refers to the sea as an archive and the lithograph of an antique goddess, the dress becomes an universal body, that archives knowledge in the same way as the sea and brings out new life.

 

Peter Miller

 

Driven by the idea of making the invisible visible, Peter Miller has developed various experimental exposure processes. Working with media sensitive light, he examines methods for recording the marks that events, objects and living creatures leave behind. By freeing himself from classical methods of photography he expands the medium, questions it and creates a spectrum of interpretation for what photography is and can be. Central to his search is the performative creation of an image and the magical act of its occurrence. The exhibited pieces are entitled „Photuris“ and show the traces of light of fireflies, which Peter Miller recorded in self- built dark boxes. Thus the patterns of movement generated by the fireflies are recorded on the paper, forming abstract drawings of light described by the artist as ‘a magical process‘: natural organic movements visualize themselves into abstract technical forms. On the one hand the works are reminiscent of automatic drawings in which the author has only a limited influence on the resulting pattern, on the other hand the works can be defined as luminograms, which are like photograms, but are specifically about the light that is being recorded.

 

Tyra Tingleff

 

Tyra Tingleff creates her oil paintings with many layers and creates complex surfaces that evoke associations of organic material, rock strata and water. Starting from secret stories which are hidden and untold, the artist paints layer on layer until it becomes a mysterious surface which is more concealing then unveiling. But although stories are somehow the basis of the paintings, it is not the approach of Tyra Tingleff to create a comprehensible narrative for the viewer. Her paintings start where human language fails in means of expression, and the things we see become things we only feel: “When I paint, I don’t want to paint what I know: I want to touch things, which I don’t know.”

 

Alvaro Urbano

 

The connection between nature and fiction is the starting point regarding the work by Alvaro Urbano. During the last two years, the old gardens of Florence and Rome got in the focus of his interest: There, he creates situations in which remains of uncertain provenance will be visible for the viewer. He brings antique statues to life by arranging traces of their alleged nightly activities in their surrounding. The viewer gets confronted with an uncanny feeling which remains vague, and reality is put on a level that only consists of imagination. The pieces we see in the exhibition shows a number of leafs that he found at Giardini dei Mostri in Rome and whose dissections remind of grotesque-like faces. With this, the uncanny of the nature gets visualized again – it functions with its own mechanisms, and at the end they stay invisible for the viewer.

 

Anna Virnich

 

For her work, Anna Virnich questions substance that is connected to the human body and its existence inside an environment that is shaped by and focused on material. On large-scaled tableaus, she combines found fabrics with new materials that are often contrary to each other in their sensual impressions. She uses snake skin as well as leather, silk and rayon. The fabrics function as background as well as the image itself and together form a organic, picturesque compositions that oscillate between transparency and intensity. the aesthetic force that is immanent in the works gets manifested in the fabrics that are stretched and pulled over the frame and finds its counterpart in the appearance of fragility, lightness and impermanence of the delicate, soft fabrics. The exhibited work entitled “Shivering Spine” shows abstract forms made out of the contrary materials leather and tulle and evokes associations of strength and softness.

 

 

a cura di Nils Petersen e Anna Redeker

 

 

Galleria Mario Iannelli è lieta di presentare “You Are What You Are”, una mostra collettiva di nove giovani artisti emergenti, le cui opere affrontano il tema della natura come materiale della nostra esistenza, servendosi di molteplici approcci artistici ed esaminando le complesse interazioni reciproche tra natura e uomini. In questo contesto, ad esempio, il tema delle trasformazioni ambientali irreversibili causate dall’azione dall’uomo svolge un ruolo altrettanto importante quanto la rappresentazione della storia, delle origini e delle esperienze soggettive, esposta attraverso materiali naturali. Nella mostra, vengono resi visibili processi naturali, quali crescita, sovrapposizione e stratificazione così come tracce di luce; facendoci riflettere sul nostro passato, sulla nostra civilizzazione e sul nostro futuro, chiedendosi come il mondo di domani comprenderà quello di oggi. Sarà possibile in un lontano futuro capire il nostro stato attuale sulla base degli oggetti che si saranno conservati nel tempo, così come noi cerchiamo di fare con la preistoria dell’umanità sulla base dei reperti archeologici e geologici? Cos’è ciò che ci rende quello che siamo e in cosa differiamo dalla natura? Alla fine resta l’interrogativo di che cosa sarà di noi – e della natura.

 

Julius von Bismarck

 

L’opera di Julius von Bismarck ruota attorno al tema centrale della percezione di natura e ambiente da parte dell’uomo. Con interventi, che inizialmente passano spesso inosservati, l’artista affronta la contrapposizione tra cultura e natura in relazione al notevole impatto che l’agire umano ha sull’ambiente che ci circonda e su come ciò influenza la percezione della natura in generale. La video-installazione “Forest Apparatus“ mostra l’artista che, con l’aiuto di diversi assistenti, trasporta pezzi di una scultura in un bosco, dove li monta e, servendosi anche di una betoniera, posiziona la statua finita. La scultura è composta di alluminio, schiuma per montaggio e pitture e si rivela alla fine una riproduzione fedele di una betulla. Dopo essere stata posizionata all’interno del bosco di betulle è praticamente indistinguibile da una betulla vera. Però, sapendo che si tratta di una betulla artificiale, è la nostra percezione complessiva del bosco a cambiare radicalmente: una volta che iniziamo a cercare la scultura di una betulla, tutti gli alberi iniziano ad apparirci ambigui e ci spingono a verificare con scetticismo se siano falsi o veri.

 

Jan Bünnig

 

Le opere dello scultore Jan Bünnig contemplano in maniera arguta e ironica sia il processo di creazione artistica che le proprietà tradizionalmente attribuite ai vari materiali che in questo processo vengono utilizzati e quelle poi che effettivamente li caratterizzano. Spesso le sue sculture sono legate a un luogo specifico e il loro stato materiale si modifica nel corso della mostra, evocando associazioni d’idee con i concetti di crescita, di provvisorietà e di incontrollabilità. L’artista utilizza perlopiù materiali originali, quali legno, argilla, pietra e sabbia, creando forme che si contrappongono alle loro caratteristiche intrinseche. Le opere esposte mettono in scena un passato che si rivela una mera affermazione dell’artista: i cosiddetti oggetti preistorici, con titoli come “Toilette Brush”, “Early Broom” e “Szepter“ hanno l’aspetto di reperti archeologici di oggetti di uso quotidiano nell’età della pietra che però si rivelano inutili per la loro possibile funzione e commentano in maniera ironica le conquiste dell’età moderna.

 

Julian Charrière

 

Imitando, ripetendo e rappresentando in maniera esagerata le influenze umane sull’ambiente sotto forma di sculture, interventi e opere video, l’artista Julian Charrière con le sue opere pratica una sorta di “Archeologia del Presente”. Ispirato alle collezioni dei musei di storia naturale, egli mette in scena la sua opera „Metamorphism“come una mostra scientifica, ma gli oggetti esposti si rivelano non reperti geologici quanto oggetti provenienti dal futuro: dentro una vetrina posta su un piedistallo si trova una massa che ricorda un campione geologico. Guardandola più attentamente, si capisce che si tratta di un blocco costituito da magma e da svariati materiali tecnici fusi insieme e poi lavorati; seppure in maniera frammentaria, è possibile riconoscere dettagli di smartphone, dischi fissi, PC portatili e tablet. Con questo lavoro Charrière rimanda alla capacità della natura di rendere visibile il passato storico mediante strati geologici e contrappone questa forma preistorica di archivio alle nostre forme di archiviazione contemporanee. Adattando l’aspetto dei supporti dati elettronici agli strati di roccia geologici, egli sviluppa “l’immagine artificiale di un passato di dopodomani, nel quale le tracce della nostra civilizzazione sono incorporate in formazioni rocciose”.

 

Paula Doepfner

 

Per le sue opere, Paula Doepfner si serve di materiali tra di loro opposti, quali vetro blindato e fiori pressati, ghiaccio che si scioglie e testi scritti a mano su carta. Partendo dal mezzo del disegno, l’artista affronta i temi della validità generale e dell’esistenza effimera delle emozioni soggettive e della loro influenza sulla nostra consapevolezza e sul nostro ambiente. Dopo averli riportati in caratteri piccolissimi, Doepfner incorpora testi di neuroscienze, filosofia e poesia nelle sue opere, formando, assieme alle piante compresse, fragili forme che ricordano anch’esse sistemi nervosi e flussi di pensiero. L’opera effimera “Stasera” è costituita da un blocco di ghiaccio nel quale sono contenuti petali e testi scritti su fogli. Nel corso della mostra, il ghiaccio si scioglie liberando i materiali al suo interno. Allo stesso modo in cui è impossibile trasmettere o ripetere un’esperienza soggettiva, la scultura non è più ricostruibile. L’opera “But I wish there was something you would do or say to try and make me change my mind and stay” mostra una forma organica costituita da petali, terra e pigmenti che rimanda similmente alla fragilità e alla fugacità degli attimi e dei pensieri.

 

Mariana Hahn

 

Mariana Hahn esamina la questione di un destino universale, che -esperienze individuali a parte - è inscritta nel nostro corpo e nel nostro ambiente. Utilizzando media diversi come la performance, il disegno, il video e la fotografia, suscita domande sul nostro passato, sulle storie e ricordi che ci hanno fatto ciò che siamo. Con le opere esposte in mostra si riferisce al corpo e al mare come un archivio. L’abito di seta ricorda nella sua struttura pelli animali e pance di pesce e, quindi, si riferisce alla natura come il materiale della nostra esistenza. Allo stesso tempo, è un simboloper l’uomo, modellato dall’evoluzione e che incorpora storia e sviluppo.Insieme con il cuore di pesce secco che si riferisce al mare come un archivio e la litografia di una dea antica, l’abito diventa un corpo universale,che archivia conoscenza nello stesso modo del mare e tira fuori nuova vita.

 

Peter Miller

 

Spinto dall’idea di rendere visibile l’invisibile, Peter Miller si è specializzato nella sperimentazione dei processi di esposizione delle pellicole fotografiche. Parten- do dalla fotografia come mezzo espressivo, egli si dedica alla visualizzazione delle tracce lasciate –
anche se solo per una frazione di secondo – da oggetti ed esseri viventi. Staccandosi dal processo classico della fotografia, egli ne allarga la potenzialità come mezzo espressivo, la mette in discussione e crea uno spettro d’interpretazione riguardo a che cosa la fotografia sia realmente e che cosa possa essere. Il punto centrale è costituito dalla performatività dell’immagine secondo la sua natura di processo e l’atto (magico) del suo realizzarsi. Le opere esposte portano il titolo “Photuris” e mostrano le scie luminose di lucciole, che l’artista ha catturato in scatole fotografiche buie appositamente costruite e rivestite all’interno di pellicola fotosensibile, un fenomeno che l’artista stesso definisce “processo magico”: movimenti naturali, organici che diventano visibili in forme tecniche e astratte.

 

Tyra Tingleff

 

Le pitture a olio astratte di Tyra Tingleff sono formate dalla sovrapposizione di numerosi strati uno sull’altro e con le loro complesse sovrapposizioni ricordano materiali organici viventi, sedimentazioni di materiali lapidei e superfici di acque. Partendo da storie nascoste, l’artista ricopre continuamente i propri dipinti con nuovi strati di pittura fino a formare una superficie misteriosa, che nasconde più di quanto non mostri. Benché queste storie costituiscano il punto di partenza delle sue opere, lo scopo di Tyra Tingleff non è di offrire all’osservatore una narrazione coerente: i suoi dipinti iniziano invece proprio laddove il linguaggio umano vien meno alla sua funzione espressiva e la percezione si riduce a ciò che è visibile: “Quando dipingo un quadro, non cerco di dipingere ciò che già so, cerco invece di raggiungere ciò che ancora non conosco.“

 

Alvaro Urbano

 

La relazione tra natura e finzione è il tema principale del lavoro artistico di Alvaro Urbano. Negli ultimi due anni, egli ha rivolto il proprio interesse in particolare verso gli antichi giardini di Roma e Firenze. In essi egli rappresenta nuovi resti del passato, la cui provenienza agli occhi dei visitatori rimane avvolta nel mistero. Egli ridà vita ad antiche sculture, circondandole delle tracce delle loro apparenti attività notturne, suscitando nell’osservatore una sensazione inquietante e trasportando la realtà in una sfera basata solamente sulla forza dell’immaginazione. La mostra espone foglie i cui contorni evocano associazioni con facce distorte da smorfie, con le quali l’artista rappresenta ancora una volta la sinistra connotazione di una natura che funziona secondo meccanismi propri, che per gli uomini non sono mai comprensibili del tutto.

 

Anna Virnich

 

Il fulcro dell’opera di Anna Virnich è rappresentato dal suo lavoro con materiali legati al corpo umano e la cui esistenza dipende da un ambiente caratterizzato dalla materialità. Su tavole di grandi dimensioni, l’artista unisce stoffe con nuovi materiali, il cui effetto sensibile spesso si contrappone ad esse. Utilizzando pelli di serpente, cuoio, seta e viscosa, materiali che sono immagine e supporto al tempo stesso, l’artista crea composizioni organiche, quasi pittoriche, oscillanti fra trasparenza e intensità. La forza estetica sprigionata da queste opere si manifesta dalle stoffe tese sui telai in legno e si trova in contrapposizione con l’impressione di fragilità, leggerezza e caducità dovuta alle delicate stoffe utilizzate. Questa opposizione è presente anche nella struttura dei materiali utilizzati nell’opera esposta, intitolata “Shivering Spine”, in cui cuoio e tulle si uniscono in forme astratte aperte alle associazioni d’idee dell’osservatore.

 

Read more Close